Top 15 Favourite Books

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At the age of (almost) 25, I have read a lot of books. I have read books I’ve loved, books I’ve hated, books that left me feeling ‘meh’, and books that I’ve abandoned. In my first quarter of a century, I’ve accumulated many books that I declare among my favourites, but these are the fifteen most loved ones that I want to share with you.

These books are in no particular order.

1

The Chronicles of Narnia by CS Lewis

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I’m seven years old, accompanying Lucy Pevensie through the wardrobe and into the Western Wood. I try to reason with Edmund as we walk towards the Witch’s castle. I sharpen my blade with Peter as we prepare for battle, and I fight alongside Susan, shooting my arrow through the hearts of Narnian traitors. As I grow older, I ride alongside Shasta and Aravis as we made the journey across the desert into Archenland. I’ll see Narnia come to life, hearing the sweet sound of Aslan’s song, singing the world into creation with Digory and Polly.

2

The Harry Potter Series by JK Rowling

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I’m eleven years old, getting my Hogwarts letter with Harry in the cupboard under the stairs. We get the train together at 11 o’clock on the 1st September, and meet Ron and Hermione along the way. I defeat Voldemort with Harry, once, twice and three times. I escape to the Burrow with the Weasley’s way too often, and tag along to the Quidditch World Cup. I stand by Harry through the rise of Voldemort and fight along side him in the Battle of Hogwarts.

3

Looking for Alaska by John Green

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It’s 2011 and I’m in Treehugger Dan’s bookshop in Budapest, Hungary. I’m 19 years old, nearly no longer a teenager, my childhood soon to be over, marked by an epic InterRail experience before university. I’m in the sale section, I see a book called Looking for Alaska by John Green for 200F, equivalent to about 50p. What draws me in is… well, everything about it. I buy it and head back to my hostel, a cute, quirky loft converted from an old town house. I sit in the bay window and devour Looking for Alaska in one sitting. I realise why I want to be a writer. I realise that grief will never leave me. I continue to seek my Great Perhaps.

4

The Phantom of Manhattan by Frederick Forsyth

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I have now “become” an adult. I’m twenty years old. I’m in my first semester of university and I have just been exposed to The Phantom of the Opera and Les Miserables, both of which I’ve read. Somewhere online, I find that the Phantom of Manhattan is the unofficial sequel to Gaston Leroux’s original novel and I fly through it in one sitting. It becomes my guilty pleasure, and much to my enjoyment, enables the musical-sequel Love Never Dies to come to fruition.

5

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

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It’s the summer of 2012 and I’ve just completed my first year at university so I head into Waterstones to celebrate. I browse the shelves, when this book catches my eye. I’ve heard it’s being made into a movie, and once I read the synopsis I’m sold. I buy this in a two for one deal along with Fifty Shades of Grey, which I soon regret, but this novel serves as a reminder why picking Creative Writing as my degree is a good decision.

6

Paper Towns by John Green

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After I realise John Green has written not one, but four other books, I head to Amazon and go on a book binge buy spree. I buy An Abundance of Katherine’s, Paper Towns, Will Grayson, Will Grayson and The Fault in Our Stars, his latest novel. Paper Towns arrives first, and on that first page, John Green becomes my second Auto-Buy author. Sitting in my porch/bedroom, as Spring turns to Summer in 2013, I delve into Q’s world, sitting next to him in the mini van as we make our way along the East Coast to find Margo.

7

The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath

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It’s Christmas 2013 and I’m in New York. I head into Barnes and Noble on 5th Avenue and browse the shelves aimlessly. Outside it’s snowing, and I know we have to get the Croton-Harmon train back before peak times but I can’t tear myself away. Most people are gazing up at the Christmas Tree at the Rockefeller Center, but I’m gazing up at the rows of books before me. I’ve always wanted to read The Bell Jar, and so I buy it there and then before I could talk myself out of it. I read it on the train all the way to Tarrytown.

8

Uglies by Scott Westerfeld

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It’s 2014 and I’m in my final semester of university. In our Creative Visions module, we’re exploring futuristic words and thus my love for dystopian fiction is born. I spend my time trying to escape the pain of assignments and dissertation talk by curling up with this book, finding a whole new definition of the word escapism. As I read, Tally and I hover board along the skyline, wondering what exactly it is that makes a person “pretty”.

9

Flowers in the Attic and the Dollanganger Saga by VC Andrews

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Despite trying to escape talk of my pending dissertation, I can’t, but I find respite in “reading for research”. Flowers in the Attic is the first book in the Dollanganger Saga, and fills my head with rich, luxurious, gothic mansions, plot twists and betrayal. I lap it up, and am reminded that my final piece for my degree is MINE, and take notes on delicious description from Ms Andrews.

10

The Divergent Series by Veronica Roth

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I’ve finally left university. My dissertation is handed in and now I’m waiting on my results. Now I can read whatever books I choose, and the thought of that alone is so liberating. When I hear that Divergent is to be made into a movie, I figure it’s just another book series jumping on the coat tails of The Hunger Games, but after I decide to read the series, I realise it’s so much more. Tris goes on a journey unlike any other. She questions what it means to be selfless and brave, and questions her identity along the way. The ending to the Divergent series is heartbreaking, but proves it’s not just another book series. It’s a social commentary on human nature.

11

We Were Liars by E Lockhart

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Three years worth of assigned reading stopped me from buying any new books, so as my graduation fast approaches in the Autumn of 2014, I look for exciting books to catch my eye. Rediscovering authors seems to be a habit of mine. Many years ago when I was in secondary school I read a booked called The Boyfriend List, now nearly ten years later I find We Were Liars by the very same E Lockhart. It’s my first trip into psychological thrillers and I LOVE it. I don’t realise the twist and it blows my mind.

12

Belzhar by Meg Wolitzer

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I’m at my very first Writing Weekend as an alumni of the University of Winchester, and Belzhar has been my most anticipated read of 2014. A YA novel, inspired by The Bell Jar, set at boarding school, and it’s right up my street. Sometimes I wish I could go back to school, just so that I could choose to go to boarding school. Or sometimes I wish I could move back into Halls of Residence, where life was much more simple.

13

Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

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My graduation has come and gone. I really am a full fledged graduate, so I retreat to a place that makes me feel safe. I’ve spent much of the past ten years online. Not just online but ONLINE, participating in forums and chat rooms, writing in online journals, and writing, writing, writing. I never thought anyone would understand my “life online”, and I didn’t know how to communicate to anyone what that time in my life meant to me, but Rainbow Rowell does it with one swift novel: Fangirl.

14

And the Hippos Were Boiled in Their Tanks… by Jack Kerouac and William S Burroughs

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It’s almost Christmas again and I’ve just finished watching Kill Your Darlings with Daniel Radcliffe. I quickly become obsessed with the Beat Generation and haul a tonne of books from that era. This book is the fictional account, similar to the Kill Your Darlings, of the murder of David Krammerer and the Beat Poets growing up in the underbelly of New York City. I adore this book the moment I read the first page and the moment I read the last.

15

Cinder and The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer

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I’m twenty three going on ten years old again. I’m scouting the scrapyard for junk metal with Cinder and Peony when she gets taken. I’m running with Cinder to warn Prince Kai about Levana. I’m sitting in the cell with Dr Erland when he tells her she’s the lost Princess Selene. I’m reminded that you’re never too old for fairy tales.

Did I mention any books in this list that you love too? Let me know in the comments.

Places to Buy Cheap Books

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The way I see it, you can spend roughly £6 on a nice new paperback, which isn’t that expensive at all. Or you can go to a charity shop and buy 4-6 almost-as-good-as-new copies for the same price. I understand that when you buy books second hand, the author doesn’t get paid as they would if you bought from a main stream retailer, but some people cannot afford to buy books full price. That’s not a criticism against them, that’s just a fact of life.

I like to buy a mix of new and second hand books, because I like to support charities as well as authors. So buying books is one thing, but buying books cheaply, or on a budget is another matter entirely. Whatever your reasoning, I’m going to let you in on some of my book buying secrets I’ve found over my twenty-four years of book loving.

(I would just like to mention before we start that I live in the UK and so I can only speak for shipping to and from the UK, not other countries. I also HAVE NOT been sponsored by any of these companies. I just buy my books from them most of the time!)

1

Amazon Market Place

This might seem relatively obvious, but Amazon Market Place is great and isn’t just for used books, it has a new option as well. It even grades how acceptable the copy is, and if you’re like me and you don’t mind a well-loved, battered, slightly annotated copy then this option is for you. Many smaller companies like  World of Books and Book Depository (both wonderful places to buy second hand or new books, see WoB’s 3-4-2 deal on their website and BD has free shipping!) both sell through Market Place so you can still buy through a name you know and trust. Most used books go for 1p on the Market Place, with £2.80 postage, so you’re likely to find something you like, in good condition, for a fraction of the price you would pay usually. Amazon also fulfills the postage options on some books so you can buy it alongside other Amazon products and combine the postage charge.

2

Ebay

Most people associate Ebay with bidding for items, and that sweat-drenched countdown that occurs in a bidding war. Actually, there are many “buy now” options that also give you a good deal. Once again, World of Books and Book Depository and other book outlets also sell through Ebay so you’re likely to find you’re buying from a company you trust rather than an individual seller. That being said, a lot of people buy books, read them once and then sell them on for a fraction of the price, or alternatively a lot of unwanted Christmas books go up in the New Year so you could find an amazing deal.

3

The Works

So, this may only be relevant if you’re a UK resident but The Works is a great place to buy cheap books. It’s billed as a craft store, and sells How-To and DIY books, but it also sells a good amount of fiction books too. On their website they recently had a deal for six fiction books for £10, which averages out at £2 a book, which is cheaper than Amazon Market Place and certainly cheaper that some charity shops. Which brings me onto my next topic…

4

Charity Shops

Again, this may only be relevant if you’re a UK resident but charity shops are a massive thing in England (particularly the South, I think) but in America you might call them thrift stores, or maybe just second hand stores. In Bexhill, where I live, we have 24 charity shops (and counting) and I often like to wander the shelves and see what people have been reading. Once again, you find the books are often in mint condition, having been read once and then given away for the charities to sell. Big names include Oxfam who have stores dedicated to books! I have bought books for 10p ranging up to £2.50-£3 depending on the shop.

5

Amazon Kindle

I know. I KNOW. Some people may feel that this option is sacrilegious to our beloved books. We cover their little ears when we talk about the controversial e-book, but hear me out people. HEAR ME OUT. E-books can, not always, but can be cheaper than physical books. I’ve downloaded a vast amount of free e-books, some being 10p, some 20p, some 50p, some £1 and they’re all relatively newly released books that you can have and to hold and read to your hearts content. AND You don’t need need to buy a Kindle to read them, you can just download the app (for free) and read book after book after book without having to carry them around with you. Kindle always offer Daily Deals too, and now that Audible is part of the Amazon family, you can upgrade your e-experience with an audiobook too. Just to give you a little taste of heaven, I bought E Lockhart’s We Were Liars on Kindle for 99p and then upgraded with audio for 99p. That’s a book and an audiobook for under £2!

So these are my trade secrets of the book world, take them, use them, abuse them (nicely) and go forth and buy books my young friends! Let me know in the comments if you get any good deals!