Bookish Places to Visit in England

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I love travelling as it is, but what I love more than that is travelling to places of literary interest. London is a great place to begin, it being the capital and all, especially as there are so many blue plaques to find. But there are many more places outside of London that you can visit. Here are a few I hope to get to in the near future.

Oxford

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Oxford is probably one of the most literary places in England! The origins of CS Lewis, JRR Tolkien, and even Lewis Carroll who attended Christ Church College. You might be aware of the famous Inklings who, together with Lewis and Tolkien, met often at the Eagle and Child pub to share their work. To top it off, even a few scenes of Harry Potter were filmed around the city.

Yorkshire

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Yorkshire is world-famous in particular for the Bronte family. Charlotte, Emily and Anne were three sisters who wrote some of the most prolific and well-loved classics, and they lived with the rest of their family in Haworth, a small town not too far from Leeds where their father was the priest there. Another noteworthy literary site is the burial place of Sylvia Plath in Heptonstall, which also resides not too far from Leeds.

Edinburgh

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I didn’t realise that Edinburgh was as literary as it is, but in fact, it is very literary! Arthur Conan Doyle was born and raised here, in 11 Picardy Place, where there is a Sherlock Holmes memorial statue and the Conan Doyle Pub to celebrate the writer’s life. JK Rowling also wrote the majority of the first few Harry Potter books in and around Edinburgh. The Elephant House Cafe boasts that it housed the writer as she was drafting the famous Potter books.

Dublin

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Dublin is home to many, many literary greats! Oscar Wilde, Bram Stoker and James Joyce to name a few! It’s picturesque and hygge aesthetic is enough to set any blogger’s and book lover’s hearts alight! Joyce even based a short story anthology around the city he loved so dearly, titled Dubliners. If you’re looking for a bit more information on Dublin Writers History, there’s even a Writer’s Museum to get you clued up.

Devon

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In particular for fans of Agatha Christie, whose holiday home Greenway is now owned and maintained by the National Trust and well worth a visit if you’re a hardcore fan. Devon was also home to Sylvia Plath’s husband Ted Hughes, and was also the setting and inspiration for the popular Sherlock Holmes novel The Hound of the Baskervilles.

These five places are on top of my literary bucket list, and hopefully after this post, they’ll be on yours too. Is there anywhere you’d like to go and visit? Literary or otherwise? Let me know in the comments!

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Places to Buy Cheap Books

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The way I see it, you can spend roughly £6 on a nice new paperback, which isn’t that expensive at all. Or you can go to a charity shop and buy 4-6 almost-as-good-as-new copies for the same price. I understand that when you buy books second hand, the author doesn’t get paid as they would if you bought from a main stream retailer, but some people cannot afford to buy books full price. That’s not a criticism against them, that’s just a fact of life.

I like to buy a mix of new and second hand books, because I like to support charities as well as authors. So buying books is one thing, but buying books cheaply, or on a budget is another matter entirely. Whatever your reasoning, I’m going to let you in on some of my book buying secrets I’ve found over my twenty-four years of book loving.

(I would just like to mention before we start that I live in the UK and so I can only speak for shipping to and from the UK, not other countries. I also HAVE NOT been sponsored by any of these companies. I just buy my books from them most of the time!)

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Amazon Market Place

This might seem relatively obvious, but Amazon Market Place is great and isn’t just for used books, it has a new option as well. It even grades how acceptable the copy is, and if you’re like me and you don’t mind a well-loved, battered, slightly annotated copy then this option is for you. Many smaller companies like  World of Books and Book Depository (both wonderful places to buy second hand or new books, see WoB’s 3-4-2 deal on their website and BD has free shipping!) both sell through Market Place so you can still buy through a name you know and trust. Most used books go for 1p on the Market Place, with £2.80 postage, so you’re likely to find something you like, in good condition, for a fraction of the price you would pay usually. Amazon also fulfills the postage options on some books so you can buy it alongside other Amazon products and combine the postage charge.

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Ebay

Most people associate Ebay with bidding for items, and that sweat-drenched countdown that occurs in a bidding war. Actually, there are many “buy now” options that also give you a good deal. Once again, World of Books and Book Depository and other book outlets also sell through Ebay so you’re likely to find you’re buying from a company you trust rather than an individual seller. That being said, a lot of people buy books, read them once and then sell them on for a fraction of the price, or alternatively a lot of unwanted Christmas books go up in the New Year so you could find an amazing deal.

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The Works

So, this may only be relevant if you’re a UK resident but The Works is a great place to buy cheap books. It’s billed as a craft store, and sells How-To and DIY books, but it also sells a good amount of fiction books too. On their website they recently had a deal for six fiction books for £10, which averages out at £2 a book, which is cheaper than Amazon Market Place and certainly cheaper that some charity shops. Which brings me onto my next topic…

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Charity Shops

Again, this may only be relevant if you’re a UK resident but charity shops are a massive thing in England (particularly the South, I think) but in America you might call them thrift stores, or maybe just second hand stores. In Bexhill, where I live, we have 24 charity shops (and counting) and I often like to wander the shelves and see what people have been reading. Once again, you find the books are often in mint condition, having been read once and then given away for the charities to sell. Big names include Oxfam who have stores dedicated to books! I have bought books for 10p ranging up to £2.50-£3 depending on the shop.

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Amazon Kindle

I know. I KNOW. Some people may feel that this option is sacrilegious to our beloved books. We cover their little ears when we talk about the controversial e-book, but hear me out people. HEAR ME OUT. E-books can, not always, but can be cheaper than physical books. I’ve downloaded a vast amount of free e-books, some being 10p, some 20p, some 50p, some £1 and they’re all relatively newly released books that you can have and to hold and read to your hearts content. AND You don’t need need to buy a Kindle to read them, you can just download the app (for free) and read book after book after book without having to carry them around with you. Kindle always offer Daily Deals too, and now that Audible is part of the Amazon family, you can upgrade your e-experience with an audiobook too. Just to give you a little taste of heaven, I bought E Lockhart’s We Were Liars on Kindle for 99p and then upgraded with audio for 99p. That’s a book and an audiobook for under £2!

So these are my trade secrets of the book world, take them, use them, abuse them (nicely) and go forth and buy books my young friends! Let me know in the comments if you get any good deals!

Show Time by Phil Harvey – Review

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Harvey’s Show Time, a grotesque social commentary bridges the gap between The Hunger Games and Stephen King. It examines human nature, our morbid curiosity and our ever declining sensitivity towards violence. With the rise of social media, reality TV (sometimes “reality” TV), violent video games and the YouTube generation, our access to potentially harmful content is at it’s peak. Popular dystopian futures, like The Hunger Games and Divergent, often provide similar commentaries, but Harvey’s Show Time gives us a raw, gritty, darker side to these worlds, and shows an inevitable step up from the previous YA bestsellers.

Phil Harvey’s recent work is a self-fulfilling prophecy. Although Suzanne Collins opened the door to this genre of YA, readers are now thirsting for something deeper, and arguably more violent, which is exactly what Harvey provides, both in the novel’s synopsis and reveals some truth in the underlying message about human nature. Show Time tells the story of a world where future viewing audiences have become totally desensitized to violence and are eager to escape their boring workaday lives. This addiction is nurtured by the media with graphic portrayals of war and crime and with so-called reality programming. Now, TV execs have created the ultimate reality show: Seven people, each bearing the scars of his or her past, are deposited on an island in the middle of Lake Superior. Given some bare necessities and the promise of $400,000 each if they can endure it. The three women and four men risk death by starvation or freezing as the Great Lakes winter approaches. The island is wired for sound, and flying drones provide the video feed, so everything the contestants do and say is broadcast worldwide. Their seven-month ordeal is entirely unscripted, they can’t ask for help or they forfeit the prize, and as far as the network is concerned—the fewer survivors the better.

The opening prologue to Show Time does not disappoint, delivering a grisly gut wrenching moment that aims to set the whole tone of the book. Although the rest of the novel fell a little flat for me, the true horror was that Show Time depicts a world that one day could be our future.

From 28th October till 3rd November, Show Time by Phil Harvey will be 0.99 FOR THIS LIMITED TIME ONLY. Get your copy at:

Amazon – iBooks Barnes and Noble

Additionally, Gumroad are selling electronic copies of Show Time and an exclusive short story Across the Water: Tales of the Human Heart for only $1.99. Get your copy here: https://gumroad.com/l/ShowTime

Phil Harvey is an award-winning author, philanthropist and libertarian whose stories won a prize from Antietam Review and were nominated for the Pushcart Prize. Find out more about Phil Harvey and his upcoming releases at: http://philharveylit.org/ 

Praise for Show Time

“Show Time is erotic and chilling in its portrayal of human survival. Entertainment serves government by dishing up the ultimate reality program to sate a nation of voyeurs and ensure the continuance of our most civilized of societies. Check your calendar—the future is already here.”Sal Glynn, scriptwriter, and author of The Dog Walked Down the Street

“Show Time is a gripping page-turner. Reality TV has never been more frighteningly real.”John Fremont, author, Sins of the Fathers

“A vision of the future that is laugh-out-loud, until we realize how much it looks like the world we live in now.”Frank S. Joseph, award-winning author of To Love Mercy

“A thrilling immersion in the emotional, physical, and sexual reality of characters who thought they were playing a game but find they must fight to survive.”Linda Morefield, senior review editor, The Washington Independent Review of Books

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