Best Books of Jul-Aug-Sep

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I’ve been rounding up my favourite books every quarter, as some of the books I read and love don’t quite make it to my end of year list. This is the third blog post I’ve done, which means we’re about three-quarters of the way through the year. At this rate, it will be almost Christmas! So here are the books I’ve really liked in the last three months, ones I’m not sure that will make the final list.

These books are in no particular order.

1.

Girlhood by Cat Clarke

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Harper has tried to forget the past and fit in at expensive boarding school Duncraggan Academy. Her new group of friends are tight; but Harper can’t escape the guilt of her twin sister’s Jenna’s death, and her own part in it – and she knows noone else will ever really understand. But new girl Kirsty seems to get Harper in ways she never expected. She has lost a sister too. Then Kirsty’s behaviour becomes more erratic. Why is her life a perfect mirror of Harper’s? And why is she so obsessed with Harper’s lost sister? How can Harper get back to the person she wants to be, and to the girls who mean the most to her? – from Goodreads.com

I managed to get an ARC of this book on NetGalley. If you don’t know what NetGalley is, it’s a website where you can apply for and download advanced reader copies granted by the publishers. Cat Clarke’s latest book gave me some serious Pretty Little Liars vibes!

2.

The School for Good and Evil by Soman Chainani

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This year, best friends Sophie and Agatha are about to discover where all the lost children go: the fabled School for Good & Evil, where ordinary boys and girls are trained to be fairy tale heroes and villains. As the most beautiful girl in Gavaldon, Sophie has dreamed of being kidnapped into an enchanted world her whole life. With her pink dresses, glass slippers, and devotion to good deeds, she knows she’ll earn top marks at the School for Good and graduate a storybook princess. Meanwhile Agatha, with her shapeless black frocks, wicked pet cat, and dislike of nearly everyone, seems a natural fit for the School for Evil. But when the two girls are swept into the Endless Woods, they find their fortunes reversed. – from Goodreads.com

I found my copy of this book in an Oxfam Bookshop and read a decent chunk of it on the train home! The friendship between Sophie and Agatha really reminded me of Elphaba and Glinda’s relationship in Wicked. Good and Evil! Not sure whether I’ll read the rest of the series but it was still super fun!

3.

Aurabel by Laura Dockrill

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It has been two years since Rory drowned, and Lorali is in Hastings, living the quiet life of a normal teenage girl. But her safe life on land won’t last for long. Life in The Whirl has become a hotbed of underwater politics and as the council jostles to oust the king, one Mer in particular has her eye on Lorali as the key to her own rise to power. Meanwhile, Aurabel, a lowly Mer from the wrong side of the trench, is attacked by sea beasts and left for dead – and without a tail. Raging with righteous anger, she rebuilds herself a mechanical tail and reinvents herself as a fearless steampunk Mer seeking revenge. But she never expected the most important job that was about to drop into her lap. – from Goodreads.com

Lorali by Laura Dockrill holds a special place in my heart, as it’s set in a nearby town to me called Hastings! Not many people know about our little corner of the world, and so when we get a starring role, especially in a book about mermaids, it’s hard not to resist! So when the ARC for Aurabel was available to request on NetGalley, I jumped at the chance!

4.

Blind by Rachel DeWoskin

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When Emma Sasha Silver loses her eyesight in a nightmare accident, she must relearn everything from walking across the street to recognizing her own sisters to imagining colors. One of seven children, Emma used to be the invisible kid, but now it seems everyone is watching her. And just as she’s about to start high school and try to recover her friendships and former life, one of her classmates is found dead in an apparent suicide. Fifteen and blind, Emma has to untangle what happened and why – in order to see for herself what makes life worth living. – from Goodreads.com

I’d had this eBook on my Kindle for a long time, but it was actually the audiobook on OverDrive that spurred me on to read it. It was amazing to hear about Emma’s story, and how the feelings of loss and bereavement could be applied in this situation.

5.

STAGS by M.A. Bennett

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Greer MacDonald is struggling to settle into the sixth form at the exclusive St. Aidan the Great boarding school, known to its privileged pupils as S.T.A.G.S. Just when she despairs of making friends Greer receives a mysterious invitation with three words embossed upon on it: huntin’ shootin’ fishin’. But when Greer joins the other chosen few at the ancient and sprawling Longcross Hall, the students are at the mercy of their capricious host, and, over the next three days, as the three bloodsports – hunting, shooting and fishing – become increasingly dark and twisted, Greer comes to the horrifying realisation that those being hunted are not wild game, but the very misfits Henry has brought with him from school… – from Goodreads.com

STAGS was another NetGalley ARC and was quite a hyped release on Goodreads and Booktube. Again, it gave me Pretty Little Liars vibes and was quite an exciting read. I felt overall it needed more pace but it’s certainly in the same vein as Cat Clarke in terms of mystery and thrills! A definite must-read for fans of Clarke’s books.

So this concludes my list of books I really enjoyed in the last three months. Did you read any of these books? Or do you want to recommend some you think I’ll like? Let me know in the comments!

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Top 5 Books Next on My TBR

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This year, I’ve been doing pretty well as far as reading goes, but I still like to round-up a collection of books I want to get to in the next few months. So here are the top five books on my TBR pile.

These books are in no particular order.

1.

A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J Maas

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Feyre’s survival rests upon her ability to hunt and kill – the forest where she lives is a cold, bleak place in the long winter months. So when she spots a deer in the forest being pursued by a wolf, she cannot resist fighting it for the flesh. But to do so, she must kill the predator and killing something so precious comes at a price – from Goodreads.com

I got on okay with Sarah J Maas’s Throne of Glass series, so I’m looking forward to seeing how A Court of Thorns and Roses fairs in my estimations. Ever since the first Throne of Glass book was released 2012, Maas’s books have been incredibly hyped upon their release and the A Court of… books have been the same!

2.

Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell

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Eleanor is the new girl in town, and with her chaotic family life, her mismatched clothes and unruly red hair, she couldn’t stick out more if she tried. Park is the boy at the back of the bus. Black T-shirts, headphones, head in a book – he thinks he’s made himself invisible. But not to Eleanor… never to Eleanor. – from Goodreads.com

The first Rainbow Rowell book I ever read was Fangirl that was released in 2013, and I somehow missed the release of Eleanor and Park which was also released in the same year. Never the less, I absolutely love Rainbow Rowell’s writing, considering I’m not much of a contemporary fan! So I can’t wait to get my teeth into the YA beauty.

3.

Queen of the Tearling by Erika Johansen

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Her throne awaits . . . if she can live long enough to take it. It was on her nineteenth birthday that the soldiers came for Kelsea Glynn. They’d come to escort her back to the place of her birth – and to ensure she survives long enough to be able to take possession of what is rightfully hers. – from Goodreads.com

I first heard of this book when Sasha Alsberg and Ben Alderson spoke about it in their Scotland Vlogs. It sounded like a really cool story, so I’ve picked up a copy to satisfy my fantasy craving!

4.

The Name of the Star by Maureen Johnson

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This is a thrilling ghost-hunting teen mystery as modern-day London is plagued by a sudden outbreak of brutal murders that mimic the horrific crimes of Jack the Ripper. – from Goodreads.com

I heard about Maureen Johnson through her affiliation with the Green brothers, and I actually met Maureen at The Fault in Our Stars Tour. As you know, I love retellings and I love crime thrillers, so this combination is perfect for me, and I can’t wait to read it!

5.

Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake

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Every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. – from Goodreads.com

This book has been on my radar for a while now, and with the sequel coming out in September, I need to hop to it and read the first one so I can get on with the series. If you know me, you know I love fantasy, and also magic, so I’m guessing this book is going to be getting a good review from me!

So this concludes my top five books that are at the top of my TBR. Have you read any of these? Would you recommend them to me? Or are these books at the top of your TBR too? Let me know in the comments!

Quick Reads: Under 200 Pages

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I love big books and I cannot lie. But sometimes there’s nothing better than a quick read, a fast-paced story to keep you going. Whether you want something to take away with you on holiday or you’re looking to keep up that Goodreads goal, quick reads work for everyone. Here are a few of my favourites.

Please be aware that the number of pages listed is subject to the edition. 

1.

The Great Gatsby by F Scott Fitzgerald

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Number of Pages: 188

Jay Gatsby is the man who has everything. But one thing will always be out of his reach. Everybody who is anybody is seen at his glittering parties. Day and night his Long Island mansion buzzes with bright young things drinking, dancing and debating his mysterious character. – from Goodreads.com

One of my favourite classics, and a rich and beautiful story too.

2.

How I Live Now by Meg Rosoff

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Number of Pages: 194

Fifteen-year-old Daisy is sent from Manhattan to England to visit her aunt and cousins she’s never met: three boys near her age, and their little sister. Her aunt goes away on business soon after Daisy arrives. The next day bombs go off as London is attacked and occupied by an unnamed enemy. As power fails, and systems fail, the farm becomes more isolated. Despite the war, it’s a kind of Eden, with no adults in charge and no rules, a place where Daisy’s uncanny bond with her cousins grows into something rare and extraordinary. – from Goodreads.com

The YA pick of the bunch. Rosoff manages to create such a layered world in such a small amount of pages.

3.

Animal Farm by George Orwell

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Number of Pages: 102

Orwell wrote the novel at the end of 1943, but it almost remained unpublished. Its savage attack on Stalin, at that time Britain’s ally, led to the book being refused by publisher after publisher. Orwell’s simple, tragic fable, telling what happens when the animals drive out Mr Jones and attempt to run the farm themselves, has since become a world-famous classic. – from Goodreads.com

Only just coming up to 100 pages, this novella is simple and easy to read, whilst also having political undertones to make you think.

 4.

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

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Number of Pages: 106

As drifters in search of work, George and his simple-minded friend Lennie have nothing in the world except each other – and a dream that they will one day have some land of their own. Eventually, they find work on a ranch, but their hopes are doomed as Lennie becomes a victim of his own strength. – from Goodreads.com

Another entry that only just graces 100 pages. Arguably, Steinbeck’s most famous work and the gentle, yet heartbreaking tale of the lengths one goes to for friendship.

5.

The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle

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Number of Pages: 174

The terrible spectacle of the beast, the fog of the moor, the discovery of a body, this classic horror story pits detective against dog. When Sir Charles Baskerville is found dead on the wild Devon moorland with the footprints of a giant hound nearby, the blame is placed on a family curse. It is left to Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson to solve the mystery of the legend of the phantom hound before Sir Charles’ heir comes to an equally gruesome end. – from Goodreads.com

One of four Sherlock Holmes novels, but by no means the shortest. In some editions, A Study in Scarlet is only 108 pages!

So this concludes my top five list of quick reads under 200 pages! Are any of these in your favourites list? Or do you have a few recommendations for me to read in time for my next quick reads post? Let me know in the comments!

Top 10 Books of 2016 (1&2)

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So, here you have it. My top two books of 2016. Here we go!

2.

Night Film by Marisha Pessl

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Everybody has a Cordova story. Cult horror director Stanislas Cordova hasn’t been seen in public since 1977. To his fans he is an enigma. To journalist Scott McGrath he is the enemy. To Ashley he was a father. On a damp October night the body of young, beautiful Ashley Cordova is found in an abandoned warehouse in lower Manhattan. Her suicide appears to be the latest tragedy to hit a severely cursed dynasty. For McGrath, another death connected to the legendary director seems more than a coincidence. The last time McGrath got close to exposing Cordova, he lost his marriage and his career. This time he could lose his grip on reality. – from Goodreads.com

I first heard about this book from PadfootandProngs07 on book-tube (and also here) and boy was it a recommendation and a half! What drew me to the book in the first place was that it was told partly in mixed media, in articles and webpages etc as well as prose. The hype that Raeleen gave this book totally lived up to the real thing, and it became my go-to recommendation for the mystery/crime genre.

1.

Winter (and The Lunar Chronicles) by Marissa Meyer

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Princess Winter is admired by the Lunar people for her grace and kindness, and despite the scars that mar her face, her beauty is said to be even more breathtaking than that of her stepmother, Queen Levana. But Winter isn’t as weak as Levana believes her to be and she’s been undermining her stepmother’s wishes for years. Together with the cyborg mechanic, Cinder, and her allies, Winter might even have the power to launch a revolution and win a war that’s been raging for far too long. – from Goodreads.com

That’s it! Fairest, Winter and Stars Above absolutely take the top spot of my 2016 favourites without a doubt. I absolutely loved this quartet and can’t quite believe that the series is over. I only finished it this year and I’m already planning a re-read, or hoping for some kind of TV Series or Movie to fill the Lunar hole.

So that concludes my top ten books that I read this year and I’m so excited to start compiling my to-read list for 2017. Do you have any recommendations for me? Or have I swayed your opinion on a book in my favourites list? Let me know in the comments!

Top 10 Books of 2016 (9&10)

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So let’s kick off with my top ten books of 2016. I read over a hundred this year, but I’ve managed to whittle down my list to a tenth of that size, and so I give you a comprehensive list of my favourites. Let’s kick off with books number nine and ten.

10

Only Ever Yours by Louise O’Neill

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eves are designed, not made.
The School trains them to be pretty
The School trains them to be good.
The School trains them to Always be Willing.
All their lives, the eves have been waiting. Now, they are ready for the outside world.
companion . . . concubine . . . or chastity
Only the best will be chosen.
And only the Men decide. – from Goodreads.com

I read this while on holiday and absolutely gobbled it up. There was something so disturbing and yet fascinating and incredibly, incredibly scary that one day this could be our reality. I’m looking forward to soon reading Asking For It by O’Neill, which is a book that got a lot of buzz this year.

9

Eligable by Curtis Sittenfeld

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Liz is a magazine writer in her late thirties who, like her yoga instructor older sister, Jane, lives in New York City. When their father has a health scare, they return to their childhood home in Cincinnati to help—and discover that the sprawling Tudor they grew up in is crumbling and the family is in disarray. Youngest sisters Kitty and Lydia are too busy with their CrossFit workouts and Paleo diets to get jobs. Mary, the middle sister, is earning her third online master’s degree and barely leaves her room, except for those mysterious Tuesday-night outings she won’t discuss. And Mrs. Bennet has one thing on her mind: how to marry off her daughters, especially as Jane’s fortieth birthday fast approaches. – from Goodreads.com

I SO enjoyed this retelling. I feel you could read it independently from Pride and Prejudice and still enjoy it as a cute, quirky contemporary. It completely reinvents the story and puts a perfect twist on an old classic.

Both of these books were big YA releases this year and both got four or five star reviews on Goodreads from yours truly. Tomorrow, I’ll be naming books number eight and seven on my list.

Great Reads: Science Fiction & Fantasy

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Now I’m not very well versed in Science Fiction and Fantasy, unless you count The Chronicles of Narnia and Harry Potter, both of which I am experts in! So particularly this year, I tried to branch out of my comfort zone and read up on those genres that I’m lacking. Here are my favourites so far!

These books are in no particular order.

1

The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger

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Audrey Niffenegger’s dazzling debut is the story of Clare, a beautiful, strong-minded art student, and Henry, an adventuresome librarian, who have known each other since Clare was six and Henry was thirty-six, and were married when Clare was twenty-three and Henry thirty-one. Impossible but true, because Henry is one of the first people diagnosed with Chrono-Displacement Disorder: his genetic clock randomly resets and he finds himself misplaced in time, pulled to moments of emotional gravity from his life, past and future. – from Goodreads.com

As debut novels go, Audrey Niffenegger pretty much hit the big time with this one. A stunningly unique account of time travel, packed in with a heavy load of romance and spanning across Clare’s lifetime, including her ups and her downs. This story is truly unforgettable and one of a kind.

2

Belzhar by Meg Wolitzer

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If life were fair, Jam Gallahue would still be at home in New Jersey with her sweet British boyfriend, Reeve Maxfield. She’d be watching old comedy sketches with him. She’d be kissing him in the library stacks. She certainly wouldn’t be at The Wooden Barn, a therapeutic boarding school in rural Vermont, living with a weird roommate, and signed up for an exclusive, mysterious class called Special Topics in English. But life isn’t fair, and Reeve Maxfield is dead. – from Goodreads.com

The therapeutic boarding school is reminiscent of many young adult novels, but this one goes a step further, introducing Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar into it’s reading list. The students are encouraged to write a journal and from there the (literal) magic unfolds.

3

Fly on the Wall by E. Lockhart

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At the Manhattan School for Art and Music, where everyone is “different” and everyone is “special,” Gretchen Yee feels ordinary. She’s the kind of girl who sits alone at lunch, drawing pictures of Spider-Man, so she won’t have to talk to anyone; who has a crush on Titus but won’t do anything about it; who has no one to hang out with when her best (and only real) friend Katya is busy. One day, Gretchen wishes that she could be a fly on the wall in the boys’ locker room–just to learn more about guys. What are they really like? What do they really talk about? Are they really cretins most of the time? Fly on the Wall is the story of how that wish comes true. – from Goodreads.com

E Lockhart’s novels are always different, but when I read the synopsis of this book I thought: “surely not. Surely she doesn’t actually turn into a fly”. But, as always, E Lockhart manages to pull it off with style. I suppose in my younger years, I had probably wished to be a fly on the wall, although in some ways I’m glad I didn’t get my wish. I can’t imagine the feeling is very pleasant.

4

Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card

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Andrew “Ender” Wiggin thinks he is playing computer simulated war games; he is, in fact, engaged in something far more desperate. The result of genetic experimentation, Ender may be the military genius Earth desperately needs in a war against an alien enemy seeking to destroy all human life. The only way to find out is to throw Ender into ever harsher training, to chip away and find the diamond inside, or destroy him utterly. Ender Wiggin is six years old when it begins. He will grow up fast. – from Goodreads.com

I was once given a copy of Ender’s Game as a present because it was “the corner stone of Science Fiction” and I can’t argue with that. It’s wonderfully simple and yet so rich in it’s world building that it’s hard to believe the whole book starts from a six year old’s perspective. I would definitely recommend it to people wanting to get more acquainted with the genre.

5

Never Let Me Go by Kauzo Ishiguro

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As children Kathy, Ruth, and Tommy were students at Hailsham, an exclusive boarding school secluded in the English countryside. It was a place of mercurial cliques and mysterious rules where teachers were constantly reminding their charges of how special they were. Now, years later, Kathy is a young woman. Ruth and Tommy have reentered her life. And for the first time she is beginning to look back at their shared past and understand just what it is that makes them special–and how that gift will shape the rest of their time together. – from Goodreads.com

This was one of the first Science Fiction books I read, and of course being the heathen that I am, I saw the film first. I spent a lot of time being VERY confused as to what was happening. Was Ruth searching for her mother? If they were made from prostitutes and tramps I just figured Hailsham was some kind of foster boarding school. Anyway, once I realised OH THEY’RE CLONES, I got much more understanding of the story, and really, really would recommend it.

So these are my top five recommendations on the Science Fiction and Fantasy genre. Do you think I’ve missed anything out? Or have I included your absolute favourite? Are there any you can recommend to me? Let me know in the comments.

Book Adaptation List: Movie Edition

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Books being adapted into movies is so common these days that I often assume that new cinema releases are based on a preexisting idea, whether that be a remake, an adaptation or a reboot. I personally love and loathe the ‘adaptation’ in equal measure. I love it because it allows me to see a favourite books of mine come alive on the big screen, which is always exciting. I also hate it, because it means that original scripts are being produced less and less, as there is no guarantee of a film’s success unless it already has a preexisting audience.

Having said that, there are some books that I (and the rest of Tumblr) often fantasize about being adapted, casting headcanons, creating manips and movie posters. So I thought I’d let you in on my top five books that I REALLY, REALLY want to be adapted into movies! (Unless they’re going to rubbish in which case, you’re alright.)

These films are in no particular order.

1

Looking for Alaska

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Miles “Pudge” Halter’s whole existence has been one big nonevent, and his obsession with famous last words has only made him crave the “Great Perhaps” (François Rabelais, poet) even more. He heads off to the sometimes crazy, possibly unstable, and anything-but-boring world of Culver Creek Boarding School, and his life becomes the opposite of safe. – from Goodreads.com

Okay, so the good news is: LOOKING FOR ALASKA THE MOVIE IS HAPPENING. Bad news is, we don’t actually know when exactly it will be happening. BUT IT WILL BE HAPPENING. I have wanted and not wanted this movie to be a thing in equal measure. Looking for Alaska was my first John Green book, it made me realise WHY I wanted to be a writer and it’s still my all time favourite book nearly five years later.

2

Thirteen Reasons Why

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Clay Jensen returns home from school to find a mysterious box with his name on it lying on his porch. Inside he discovers thirteen cassette tapes recorded by Hannah Baker, his classmate and crush who committed suicide two weeks earlier. – from Goodreads.com

Apparently this is book is due to become a TV series (more on that topic later) which would also be awesome, but if it never gets off the ground I think this book would make a fantastic movie. With flashbacks, Hannah’s chilling voice over from the cassettes, I may just write the screenplay myself!

3

Belzhar

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If life were fair, Jam Gallahue would still be with her sweet British boyfriend, Reeve Maxfield. She certainly wouldn’t be at The Wooden Barn, a therapeutic boarding school in rural Vermont, living with a weird roommate, and signed up for an exclusive, mysterious class called Special Topics in English. But life isn’t fair, and Reeve Maxfield is dead. – from Goodreads.com

Derived from Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar, Meg Wolitzer paints a vivid picture of The Wooden Barn where Jam Gallahue is residing after the death of her boyfriend Reeve Maxfield. I think this book would make an excellent adaptation, especially since Jam is an unreliable narrator.

4

We Were Liars

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A beautiful and distinguished family. A private island. A brilliant, damaged girl; a passionate, political boy. A group of four friends—the Liars—whose friendship turns destructive. A revolution. An accident. A secret. Lies upon lies. True love. The truth. – from Goodreads.com

An idyllic island off the coast of Maine and another unreliable narrator makes for a perfect film in my eyes. In fact, it’s another book-to-movie adaptation that is reportedly in development and I can’t wait!

5

Cinder

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Humans and androids crowd the raucous streets of New Beijing. A deadly plague ravages the population. From space, a ruthless lunar people watch, waiting to make their move. No one knows that Earth’s fate hinges on one girl. – from Goodreads.com

Not only would I love to see Cinder be made into a movie, I want Scarlet, Cress and Winter to be adapted too! After the success of Into the Woods and Disney’s Live Action retellings, I’m sure a production company will snap up the rights in no time.

Let me know down in the comments the books you want to see being made into movies. Have I missed any good ones? Let me know.