Great Reads: Non-Fiction

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I wouldn’t say I’m very well versed in non-fiction, but it’s something that has been creeping up on my TBR during this last year, so now I have a great plethora of recommendations for all your non-fiction reads. Here are the top five that I’ve chosen for you today.

These books are in no particular order.

1.

How to Be a Woman by Caitlin Moran

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Though they have the vote and the Pill and haven’t been burned as witches since 1727, life isn’t exactly a stroll down the catwalk for modern women. They are beset by uncertainties and questions: Why are they supposed to get Brazilians? Why do bras hurt? Why the incessant talk about babies? And do men secretly hate them? Caitlin Moran interweaves provocative observations on women’s lives with laugh-out-loud funny scenes from her own, from adolescence to her development as a writer, wife, and mother. – from Goodreads.com

Caitlin’s memoir was one of the first books I read this year. It’s compiled of hilarious personal essays on different subjects related to being a woman. It had me laughing out loud!

2.

We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

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What does “feminism” mean today? That is the question at the heart of We Should All Be Feminists, a personal, eloquently-argued essay – adapted from her much-viewed Tedx talk of the same name – by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the award-winning author of ‘Americanah’ and ‘Half of a Yellow Sun’. – from Goodreads.com

This little gem is only 64 pages, so there’s no excuse not to read it really. Adichie’s fantastic conversational style makes this easy to gobble up in one sitting and really highlights a conversation we should all be having.

3.

The Bling Ring by Nancy Jo Sales

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It’s 19 September 2010, and 21-year-old Rachel Lee has emerged from Los Angeles Superior Court, having just been sentenced to four years behind bars. A few months earlier, she had been running the Bling Ring: a gang of rich, beautiful, wild-living Valley teens who idolised celebrity, designer labels and luxury brands. Who, in 2009, became the most audacious thieves in recent Hollywood history. – from Goodreads.com

Investigative journalist, Nancy Jo Sales, researched in depth the burglaries made by the infamous Bling Ring. She interviewed the teens themselves, the families and the celebrities targeted, and made a very, VERY interesting interesting case for why people are so obsessed with celebrity.

4.

Unnaturally Green by Felicia Ricci

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In January of 2010, a wide-eyed English grad went from peddling software in NYC to understudying the lead role in WICKED the musical — her first professional theater gig (ever). UNNATURALLY GREEN is the humorous account of the entire journey, from her pit-stain-filled audition to the bittersweet closing night. – from Goodreads.com

WICKED: The Musical is one of my absolutely favourites and so when I saw this in the memoir section, I absolutely had to read it! I love the OZ books too, and Danielle Paige’s Dorothy Must Die series which is an elaboration on L. Frank Baum world. Felicia Ricci not only gives us a backstage glimpse of the musical Wicked, but also what it’s like to be a musical theatre performer.

5.

How to Be a Heroine by Samantha Ellis

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How To Be A Heroine is Samantha’s funny, touching, inspiring exploration of the role of heroines, and our favourite books, in all our lives – and how they change over time, for better or worse, just as we do. – from Goodreads.com

I absolutely gobbled up this book, and I have also identified with many literary heroines throughout my reading life. It made me want to go back and re-read all my favourite literary heroines to see what I thought of them now. Something that I feel should not be encouraged as I have a TBR pile as tall as my ceiling!

So that concludes my top five non-fiction great reads! Have I manged to sway you? Or are there some you feel I’ve missed? Let me know in the comments!

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